OUR ADOPTION PROCESS:

  1. Click here to complete our online application. Alternatively, Click Here to access our printable adoption/foster application.  Fill it out and send it back to us via e-mail or snail mail.
  2. We will review your application and then follow up with a telephone interview.
  3. Next, you get to meet our cats and see if there is “chemistry”!
  4. If you want a cat, we will arrange a home visit with someone from our organization.
  5. If all goes well, we deliver your new family member to you.  At that time, you will be asked to sign the “adoption contract”.  There is an adoption fee of $150 per cat.  Your cat will come to you fully “vetted”.  This means he/she was examined by our Veterinarian, spayed/neutered, vaccinated and tested for FIV and FeLV and microchipped (including microchip registration).
  6. We will be in touch with you as you and your new kitty acclimate to each other in your home.  We are available for advice and counseling as needed.  We can loan you a cage should you need this to introduce your new kitty to existing pets or to an environment that warrants this.
  7. Of course, we will cheer your progress!

Foster/Adoption Application CLICK HERE

Currently Adoptable CLICK HERE

THE HOME VISIT:

A home visit is when we visit your home to be sure your home environment is “cat friendly” and to give pointers and chat some more.

We look to be sure that you have screens on your windows.  Yes, cats have escaped through very small openings that you would never expect to be possible!  Kitties escaping  their new home is really terrible.  They don’t know the area and this can be deadly.  Additionally, a fall from considerable heights can be deadly.  Bottom line… you want screens on your windows.

We look to see if you have holes in your walls.  Yes, cats have gotten stuck in walls.  That’s not pretty either.

We want to meet ALL of the members of your household to be able to provide useful information to each person regarding the new kitty.

We want to meet the other pets you may have, assess their personality and provide suggestions about how best to introduce them.

If we see that you have furniture or breakables that may get damaged by kitty, we will offer suggestions and ideas.

We can share what we know about your new kitty’s habits and preferences, including the types of food and litter and litter pan that would work well for your kitty.  That way you will know what to have on hand when your new kitty arrives.

HOME VISITS ARE A GOOD THING!  They are an opportunity for you to ask questions  and get advice to help you and your kitty have an easy transition to kitty’s new home.

DECLAWING:

Not a good idea.  Are you aware that declawing means that the first knuckle of every finger on your kitty is surgically removed?   Cruel?  YES it is!

One terrible outcome of declawing is that cats can become biters.   Here you have a well-meaning family who takes an affectionate cat to be declawed.  That kitty now becomes an unpredictable biter and they can’t afford to have a biter around children.  You can guess the outcome!  That wonderful kitty is no longer an adoptable cat.  This is a true story and the cat ended up at a kill shelter.  Some of these declawed cats are put out on the street where of course they do not survive.

There are alternatives to declawing.  You can provide lots of scratching posts, and keep the nails trimmed.   There is also a product called “soft paws” which are caps that your veterinarian can glue onto your cats nails.

Declawing is never needed.

ABOUT IN-DOOR/ OUT-DOOR CATS:

NOT a good idea.  Pets need to stay indoors.

The lifespan of an indoor cat is YEARS longer than one that goes outdoors.  Outside, your cat is subjected to predators, illness, poisons, attack by other cats looking to protect territory, being hit by cars and being attacked by humans who don’t like animals.  Best to give your cat a window perch to look at the birds and keep him safely inside with a view of the world.  You can even get him a companion cat to keep him occupied and socialized and well exercised.  Outside is not stimulating for your kitty, it is life threatening.

ADOPTION IS A LIFETIME COMMITMENT:

We cannot stress enough that adopting an animal is a lifetime commitment. Your cat can live 20 years and hopefully will.

A lifetime commitment includes at least each of the following:

  1. That you will provide continuing appropriate medical care throughout your cat’s life.
  2. That you will provide daily love and affection (unless the cat is “supposedly unadoptable”).
  3. That you will provide care for your pet if you are away.
  4. Should you move, you will be sure to find a new home that will allow you to bring your pet.
  5. That you will make arrangements in advance for who will take care of your pet in the event of an unforeseen emergency or of your death.

Foster/Adoption Application CLICK HERE

A LIFETIME COMMITMENT PREVENTS AN ANIMAL FROM BEING UNNECESSARILY EUTHANIZED

We get the “kill list” every day from the local shelters.  Thousands of animals are being euthanized because the family moved or the owner got sick or entered a nursing home or passed away.  We don’t want your kitty to be one of them.  We want to do everything possible to ensure that your pet will be cared for by someone who really cares… for the rest of his/her natural life.

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